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Bug Out With UConn Extension

UConn Extension’s Bug Week is right around the corner, and we have programs for the whole family.

Bugs are the unsung heroes of our ecosystem, providing services such as pollination and natural pest control. However, bugs don’t stop at environmental benefits. They have also impacted our culture through the manufacturing of silk, sources of dyes, wax and honey production, food sources, and the improvement of building materials and structures. There are also problem bugs, like the Emerald Ash Borer and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug that are a concern in Connecticut. Visit our website at www.bugs.uconn.edu for featured insects and resources.

All ages are welcome to attend and explore the activities and events dedicated to insects and their relatives. Bug Week programs include:

  • Pests and Guests will be held at the Tolland Agricultural Center in Vernon on Monday, July 24th at 5:30 PM. Activities include: cooking with bugs, games and demos for the whole family, and learning about bugs in the garden. Please register at http://s.uconn.edu/3r7 or call 860-486-9228.
  • Insect Wonders at the Farm: Join UConn Extension faculty and Spring Valley Student Farm staff and students for an interactive, fun-filled ‘buggy’ event. Learn about our amazing and important insect friends by collecting and observing them. Activities for the whole family will include insect collecting, insect-inspired crafts, Bug-Bingo and a scavenger hunt. This event will be held on Tuesday, July 25th from 9-10:30 AM. The rain date is July 26th.
  • Join the Museum of Natural History, AntU and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology for an exciting afternoon on campus on Thursday, July 27th from 1-5 PM. We have tours of the insect collections, an AntU presentation, plus exhibit activities, microscope stations, giveaways, and a live ant colony. There will also be special greenhouse displays. Please register at http://s.uconn.edu/3r7 
  • Pollinators at Auerfarm in Bloomfield on Friday, July 28th from 9 AM -12 PM will have a station at the beehive, pollinator plants, and a hands-on make and take activity. The farm is home to a Foodshare garden, 4-H programs and more, offering fun for the entire family. Please register at http://s.uconn.edu/3r7 or 860-486-9228.
  • Find out all about insects and where to look for them at Bug Walks at the Tolland Agricultural Center in Vernon on Saturday, July 29th from 10 AM-1 PM. The program will have live insects on display, right out in the open, plus part of the insect collection from the UConn Natural History Museum, as well as three bug hunts that include going to the butterfly/pollinator garden and the vegetable garden on the property.
  • A photo contest is being offered, with three categories: junior, senior and professional. More details can be found at: http://bugs.uconn.edu/photo-contest/

UConn Extension offices are located across the state and offer an array of services dedicated to educating and informing the public on innovative technology and scientific improvements. Bug Week is one example of UConn Extension’s mission in tying research to real life, by addressing insects and some of their relatives.

For more information on Bug Week, please visit our website at www.bugs.uconn.edu, email bugweek@uconn.edu or call 860-486-9228.

2016 Photo Contest Winners

Thank you to all of our photo contest participants, and congratulations to the winners:

Lopez T Bug
“T Bug”
1st Place Junior: Amelie Lopez
Young Grasshopper
“Young Grasshopper”
1st Place Professional – Jennifer Dacey
Ant at the Allium
“An Ant at the Allium”
1st Place Senior – Alyssa Mattei
summer visitor
“Summer Visitor”
2nd Place Senior – Harley Erickson
forest encounter
“Forest Encounter”
3rd Place Senior – Sylvia Gott

Another Great Year of Bug Week

Thank you to everyone who participated in Bug Week this year. We had a great time at all of our programs and are looking forward to 2017!

Students at Bug Week
Students at Spring Valley Student Farm helped with Insect Wonders at the Farm
walking at farm
Insect Wonders at the Farm. Photo: Alejandro Chiriboga
Ana, Julia and Alejandro
Ana Legrand, Julia Cartabiano and Alejandro Chiriboga at Insect Wonders at the Farm
Maryann and sign
Maryann Fusco-Rollins

bee
Bug Week!
insects on plant
Bug Week!
catching insects
Ana Legrand helps a Bug Week participant catch an insect.
eating mealworms
FoodCorps service members sample mealworms
Mealworms
Preparing to sample mealworms with our FoodCorps service members
Pests and Guests
Displays at Pests and Guests Bug Week activity

crafts
Crafts at Pests and Guests Bug Week activity

Bug Week 2016 – Fun for the Whole Family

UConn Extension’s Bug Week is right around the corner, and we have programs for the whole family.

Paw Paw Sphinx Caterpillar
Paw Paw Sphinx Caterpillar. Photo: Pamm Cooper

Bugs are the unsung heroes of our ecosystem, providing services such as pollination and natural pest control. However, bugs don’t stop at environmental benefits. They have also impacted our culture through the manufacturing of silk, sources of dyes, wax and honey production, food sources, and the improvement of building materials and structures. There are also problem bugs, like the Emerald Ash Borer and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug that are a concern in Connecticut. Visit our website at www.bugs.uconn.edu for featured insects and resources.

All ages are welcome to attend and explore the activities and events dedicated to insects and their relatives. Bug Week programs include:

  • Pests and Guests will be held at the Tolland Agricultural Center in Vernon on Monday, July 25th at 5:30 PM. Activities include: cooking with bugs, games and demos for the whole family, and learning about bugs in the garden. We have a few spots available, please RSVP to bugweek@uconn.edu or call 860-486-9228.
  • Insect Wonders at the Farm: Join UConn Extension faculty and Spring Valley Student Farm staff and students for an interactive, fun-filled ‘buggy’ event. Learn about our amazing and important insect friends by collecting and observing them. Activities for the whole family will include insect collecting, insect-inspired crafts, Bug-Bingo and a scavenger hunt. This event will be held on Tuesday, July 26th from 9-10:30 am and 5:30-7 pm. The rain date is July 27th. Both sessions will be offered in English and Spanish.
  • Jane O’Donnell, Manager of Scientific Collections, Invertebrates will offer tours of the Insect Collections in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology on Thursday, July 28th. All tours are full, please make plans to join us next year.
  • Find out all about insects and where to look for them at Bug Walks and Talks at the Tolland Agricultural Center in Vernon on Saturday, July 30th from 10-1 PM. We will have guided bug hunts every hour, at 10, 11, noon. Two talks will be offered: “Gardening for Native Pollinators and Butterflies” by Pamm Cooper at 10:15 and “Insect Pests of the Vegetable Garden” by Joan Allen at 11:15. We have part of the UConn Natural History museum’s insect collection with Dave Colberg, plus live specimens including native walking sticks, caterpillars and other insects found in Connecticut. We also have on-site vegetable and butterfly gardens, and will have information available about gypsy moths.
  • A photo contest is being offered, with three categories: junior, senior and professional. More details can be found at: http://bugs.uconn.edu/photo-contest/

UConn Extension offices are spread across the state and offer an array of services dedicated to educating and informing the public on innovative technology and scientific improvements. Bug Week is one example of UConn Extension’s mission in tying research to real life, by addressing insects and some of their relatives.

For more information on Bug Week, please visit our website at www.bugs.uconn.edu or email bugweek@uconn.edu or call 860-486-9228.

Wild and Wonderful Insects of New England

Article and photos by Pamm Cooper

elderberry borer
Elderberry Borer. Photo by Pamm Cooper.

Toward the end of spring and the beginning of summer, I find that the most interesting insects are to be found. While spring offers some really good forester caterpillars and their attractive moths, among other things, nature seems to me to save the best for last, it seems to me. From beetles to butterflies, moths and their caterpillars, from June on there are some fabulous finds out there.

I have to admit to being a caterpillar enthusiast, and am partial to the sphinx, dagger, slug and prominent caterpillars and then the butterfly cats as well. Last year the swallowtail butterflies were few and far between, but this year our three main species- black, spicebush and tiger- are clearly more numerous. If you know where to look, you can find them.

I like to turn over elm leaves and search for two really spectacular caterpillars. The first is the double-toothed prominent, whose projections along its back resemble those of a stegosaurus. Along with its striking coloration and patterns, this is a truly remarkable find for anyone who takes the time to look and see. The second one is the elm sphinx, sometimes called the four- horned sphinx. This caterpillar has both a brown and a green form, and has little ridges running along its back. It is a behemoth, as well, like many sphinx caterpillars- robust and heavy.

Read more…

Bug Week Offers Programs for the Whole Family

 

praying mantis
Praying Mantis. Photo: Stacey Stearns

UConn Extension’s Bug Week is right around the corner, and we have programs for the whole family.

Bugs are the unsung heroes of our ecosystem, providing services such as pollination and natural pest control. However, bugs don’t stop at environmental benefits. They have also impacted our culture through the manufacturing of silk, sources of dyes, wax and honey production, food sources, and the improvement of building materials and structures. There are also problem bugs, like the Emerald Ash Borer and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug who are a concern in Connecticut. Visit our website at www.bugs.uconn.edu for featured insects and resources.

All ages are welcome to attend and explore the activities and events dedicated to insects and their relatives. Bug Week programs include:

–      Pests and Guests will be held at the Tolland Agricultural Center in Vernon on Monday, July 20th at 5:30 PM.Activities include: cooking with bugs, games and demos for the whole family, and learning about bugs in the garden. We still have a few spots available, please RSVP to bugweek@uconn.edu or call 860-870-6974.

–  Join UConn Extension faculty and Spring Valley Student Farm staff and students for an interactive, fun-filled ‘buggy’ event. Learn about our amazing and important insect friends by collecting and observing them. Activities for the whole family will include insect collecting, insect-inspired crafts and a scavenger hunt. This event will be held on Tuesday, July 21st from 9-10:30 am and 5:30-7 pm. The rain date is July 22nd. Both sessions will be offered in English and Spanish.

–       Dr. Jane O’Donnell, Manager of Scientific Collections, Invertebrates will offer tours of the Insect Collections in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology on Thursday, July 23rd. Times available are 10 AM, 10:30 AM, 2 PM and 2:30 PM. Please RSVP to bugweek@uconn.edu or 860-486-9228.

–       Find out all about insects and where to look for them in this UConn Bug Week event at the Museum of Natural History in Storrs on Saturday, July 25th from 1-3 PM. We’ll focus on Lepidopterans, the order of insects that includes butterflies and moths, but will see what other types of insects we can find too! This event will include a short indoor presentation with live specimens and an outdoor exploratory walk with tips on where to find a variety of insects in their natural habitats. Discover more Bug Week activities at http://bugs.uconn.edu.

–       For more information on our programs please visit http://bugs.uconn.edu

UConn Extension offices are spread across the state and offer an array of services dedicated to educating and informing the public on innovative technology and scientific improvements. Bug Week is one example of UConn Extension’s mission in tying research to real life by addressing insects and some of their relatives.

For more information on Bug Week, please visit our website at www.bugs.uconn.edu or email bugweek@uconn.eduor call 860-486-9228.

Want More Bugs?

butterfly on girls nose
Photo: The Maritime Aquarium of Norwalk

Are you looking for more bug related activities, and can’t wait for Bug Week? We’ve pulled together a few things of interest for you:

WayBack Burgers is offering Cricket Milkshakes. WNPR and the Daily Share both had news stories about it. The milkshakes are only offered for a limited time, stop and visit a Wayback Burger before September to try one.

The “Flutter Zone” is a special exhibit of live butterflies from Asia and South America at the Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk. The Aquarium is also offering ‘Flight of the Butterflies’ in IMAX through September 7th.

Million Pollinator Garden Challenge

Million Pollinator logoPollinators are responsible for 1 out of 3 bites of food we take each day, and yet pollinators are at critical point in their own survival. Many reasons contribute to their recent decline. We know for certain, however, that more nectar and pollen sources provided by more flowering plants and trees will help improve their health and numbers. Increasing the number of pollinator-friendly gardens and landscapes will help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across the country.
The Million Pollinator Garden Challenge (MPGC) is a nationwide call to action to preserve and create gardens and landscapes that help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across America. We will move millions of individuals, kids and families outdoors and make a connection between pollinators and the healthy food people eat.
Pollinators Gardens Should
  • use plants that provide nectar and pollen sources
  • provide a water source,
  • be situated in sunny areas with wind breaks
  • create large “pollinator targets” of native or non-invasive plants
  • establish continuous bloom throughout the growing season
  • eliminate or minimize the impact of pesticides.
The MPGC mobilizes America’s extensive gardening community, and supports them in making more native and non-invasive pollen and nectar producing plants available in their gardens.  The Challenge increases their understanding of the critical role that such actions can play in reversing declining pollinator populations.